Purple flower weeds in grass (look out for these purple ones)

If you’re a homeowner who takes pride in maintaining a lush, green lawn, then you know how frustrating it can be to discover purple flower weeds growing in your grass. These weeds can be difficult to identify and even harder to get rid of, but with the right knowledge and tools, you can effectively control their growth and prevent them from taking over your lawn.

Fortunately, there are several effective methods for controlling and removing purple weeds from your lawn. From manual removal to chemical treatments, there are many options available to suit your needs and preferences. With a little bit of knowledge and effort, you can keep your lawn looking healthy and vibrant all season long.

broadleaf weeds purple flowers

Table of Contents

Identifying Purple Flower Weeds

Among the many purple-flowered weeds, the most common ones are wild violet, henbit, creeping charlie, and purple deadnettle. These weeds are notorious for invading lawns and gardens and can be challenging to control. Wild violet has heart-shaped leaves and produces small, delicate flowers. Henbit has small, pinkish-purple flowers and is commonly found in lawns. Creeping charlie has scalloped leaves and produces small, bluish-purple flowers. Purple deadnettle has a square stem and produces purple flowers with distinctive hooded shapes.

Identifying Purple Flower Weeds

As someone who has dealt with purple weed weeds in my own grass, I know how frustrating they can be. However, before you can effectively get rid of them, you need to be able to identify them. 

Here are some common characteristics and specific weed types to help you identify purple flower weeds in your grass.

Common Characteristics

Most flower weeds have some common characteristics that can help you identify them. These include:

  • Rounded or heart-shaped leaves

  • Scalloped or lobed edges on the leaves

  • Square stem

  • Hairy leaves or stem

  • Purple blooms

If you see these characteristics in a weed in your grass, there’s a good chance it’s a perennial weed or a purple flower weed.

Specific Weed Types

Here are some specific weed types that commonly have purple flowers:

  • Purple Dead Nettle: This weed has purple flowers and leaves that are heart-shaped with scalloped edges. It also has a square stem and is hairy.

  • Henbit: This weed has small purple flowers and leaves that are rounded with scalloped edges. It has a square stem and is hairy.

  • Creeping Charlie: This weed has purple flowers and leaves that are rounded with scalloped edges. The leaves are also hairy and have a distinct odor when crushed.

  • Bugleweed: This weed has small purple flowers and leaves that are heart-shaped with scalloped edges. It has a square stem and is hairy.

common lawn weeds

Common Purple Flower Weeds

As a gardener, I have come across several types of flower weeds that can be found in grass. In this section, I will discuss the most common ones and provide some information on how to identify them.

Creeping Charlie

Creeping Charlie, also known as ground ivy, is a common weed with purple or white flowers, that can be found in grass. It is a member of the mint family and has a square-shaped stem. The leaves are round and have scalloped edges. Creeping Charlie can be difficult to control because it spreads quickly and can root at the nodes.

Wild Violet

Wild violets are another common weed with purple flowers that can be found in grass. They have heart-shaped leaves and can form a dense mat in lawns. Wild violets can be difficult to control because they have a deep root system.

Purple Deadnettle

Purple deadnettle is a member of the mint family and has a square-shaped stem. It has purple flowers that bloom in the early spring and can continue into late spring and summer. The leaves are fuzzy and have a reddish-purple hue to them.

Canada Thistle

Canada thistle is another common weed with purple flowers that can be found in grass. It has a deep root system and can be difficult to control. The leaves are spiny and have a waxy coating that makes them difficult to kill with herbicides.

Musk Thistle

Musk thistle is a biennial weed with purple flowers that can be found in grass. It has a deep taproot and can grow up to six feet tall. The leaves are spiny and have a waxy coating that makes them difficult to kill with herbicides.

Bull Thistle

Bull thistle is a biennial weed with purple and yellow flowers, that can be found in grass. It has a deep taproot and can grow up to six feet tall. The leaves are spiny and have a waxy coating that makes them difficult to kill with herbicides.

Black Nightshade

Black nightshade is a common weed with purple flowers that can be found in grass. It has a shallow root system and can be easily pulled by hand. The leaves are oval and have a pointed tip.

Healall

Healall, also known as self-heal, is a common weed with purple or pink flowers, that can be found in grass. It has a shallow root system and can be easily pulled by hand. The leaves are oval and have a pointed tip.

Forget-Me-Not

Forget-me-not is a common weed with purple flowers that can be found in grass. It has a shallow root system and can be easily pulled by hand. The leaves are oval and have a pointed tip.

common lawn weed

Growth and Propagation of Purple Flower Weeds

Understanding how these weeds grow and propagate can help you better control them in your lawn.

Seed Spread

One of the main ways that purple flower weeds spread is through their seeds. These weeds produce a large number of seeds, which can be carried by the wind or by animals to new locations. Once these seeds land in a suitable environment, they can quickly germinate and grow into new plants.

To prevent seed spread, it’s important to remove the weeds before they have a chance to produce seeds. This can be done by hand-pulling the weeds or by using a weed trimmer to cut them down before they flower.

Rhizomes Propagation

Some purple flower weeds, such as ironweed, can also spread through their rhizomes. Rhizomes are underground stems that can produce new shoots and roots, allowing the plant to spread horizontally.

To control rhizome propagation, it’s important to remove the entire plant, including the roots. This can be done by digging up the plant or using a herbicide that targets the roots.

Seed Production

Purple flower weeds can produce a large number of seeds, which can quickly spread throughout your lawn. To prevent seed production, it’s important to remove the weeds before they have a chance to flower.

If you do notice purple flower weeds in your lawn, it’s important to take action to control them before they have a chance to spread. By understanding how these weeds grow and propagate, you can take steps to prevent them from taking over your lawn.

Seed Spread weeds

Impact on Gardens and Lawns

Nutrient Absorption

Purple flower weeds in grass can have a negative impact on the nutrient absorption of gardens and lawns. These weeds, especially the invasive and noxious ones, can compete with other plants for nutrients, water, and sunlight. This can lead to stunted growth and poor health of the plants in the garden or lawn.

In particular, tall purple flower weeds can shade out other plants and reduce the amount of sunlight that reaches them. This can be detrimental to plants that require full sun to thrive. 

Ground cover purple flower weeds, on the other hand, can spread rapidly in moist soil and form dense mats that prevent other plants from accessing nutrients and water in the soil.

Invasive Nature

Purple flower weeds in grass can also be invasive and take over large areas of gardens and lawns. They can spread quickly and outcompete native plants, leading to a loss of biodiversity. Some invasive purple flower lawn weeds though, such as wild violet, can also be difficult to control and eradicate once established.

Invasive purple flower weeds can also have a negative impact on the overall health of the garden or lawn ecosystem. They can alter soil chemistry, reduce soil quality, and make it more difficult for other plants to grow. This can lead to a cascade of negative effects, including reduced habitat for beneficial insects and wildlife.

Overall, it is important to manage and control purple flower weeds in grass to prevent them from negatively impacting the health and biodiversity of gardens and lawns. This can include using natural methods such as hand weeding or mulching, or chemical methods such as herbicides.

lawn weeds of purple color

Control and Eradication Methods

Herbicides Use

When it comes to controlling and eradicating purple flower weeds in grass, herbicides can be an effective solution. Herbicides are chemicals that kill weeds and prevent them from growing back. There are two types of herbicides: pre-emergent and post-emergent.

Pre-emergent herbicides are applied before the weeds have a chance to grow. They work by preventing the weed seeds from germinating. Post-emergent herbicides are applied after the weeds have already grown. They work by killing the weed from the leaves down to the roots.

It is essential to read the label of the herbicide carefully to ensure that it is safe to use on your grass and that it will effectively target the type of weed you are trying to eradicate. 

Always follow the instructions on the label when applying herbicides, as misuse can lead to damage to your lawn or even harm to humans and animals.

Mowing Strategy

Mowing is another effective way to control and eradicate purple flower weeds in grass. Regular mowing can prevent weeds with purple flowers from producing seeds and spreading throughout your lawn. However, it is important to mow your lawn at the right height and frequency to have the desired effect.

Mowing your lawn too short can stress the grass and create bare spots where weeds can take hold. On the other hand, mowing your lawn too infrequently can allow the weeds to grow too tall and produce seeds. 

A general rule of thumb is to mow your lawn to a height of 2.5 to 3 inches and to mow it often enough that you never cut more than one-third of the grass blades at a time.

mowing purple weeds from lawn

Ecological Impact and Uses

Attracting Pollinators

Purple flower weeds in grass can attract pollinators such as bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. These insects and birds are essential for pollinating plants, which helps to maintain healthy ecosystems. 

By allowing these purple flowering weeds to grow in your yard, you are providing a valuable food source for pollinators and helping to support their populations.

Edibility

While many purple flower weeds in grass are not edible, some are. For example, the common violet (Viola sororia) produces edible leaves and flowers that can be used in salads or as a garnish. 

Other edible purple flower weeds include chicory (Cichorium intybus), which has a bitter flavor and can be used in salads or as a coffee substitute, and clover (Trifolium spp.), which has a sweet, nutty flavor and can be used in soups or stews.

Medicinal Use

Some purple flower weeds in grass have medicinal properties. For example, the common violet (Viola sororia) has been used for centuries to treat coughs, colds, and sore throats. 

It is also believed to have anti-inflammatory and diuretic properties. Other purple flower weeds with medicinal uses include chicory (Cichorium intybus), which has been used to treat digestive problems, and yarrow (Achillea millefolium), which has been used to treat wounds and reduce fever.

bee pollinator

Conclusion

Even professionals can have a hard time telling dallisgrass and crabgrass apart, but the seed head is the distinguishing feature. Crabgrass seed heads are small and fine, while dallisgrass seed heads are larger and have small black spots. If you are still unsure, make sure you contact a professional who will be able to advise you on the best course of action to take.

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Oliver Wright
Oliver Wright

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