Kentucky weeds (common ones you’ll find)

Kentucky is home to a variety of weeds that can be found in lawns, gardens, pastures, and other areas. These weeds can be invasive and cause damage to crops, gardens, and other plants. It is important to be able to identify these weeds in order to control their growth and prevent further damage. 

There are several resources available for identifying weeds in Kentucky, including field guides and online resources. Understanding the types of weeds that are common in Kentucky can help individuals take the necessary steps to manage them effectively.

Kentucky weeds snippet

Table of Contents

kentucky weeds

Name of weed Family
Bull Thistle Asteraceae
Buttercup Annual or perennial
Chicory Asteraceae
Cocklebur Asteraceae
Common Milkweed Apocynaceae
Dandelion Asteraceae
Dock Polygonaceae
Goldenrod Asteraceae
Hemp Dogbane Apocynaceae
Horsenettle Solanaceae
Jimsonweed Solanaceae
Marshelder Asteraceae
Maypop Passionflower Passifloraceae
Multiflora Rose Rosaceae
Musk Thistle Asteraceae
Perilla Mint Lamiaceae or mint
Pigweed Amaranthaceae
Plantain Plantaginaceae
Plumeless Thistle Acanthoides
Posion Hemlock Apiaceae
Queen Anne's Lace Apiaceae
Sericea Lespedeza Fabaceae
Tall Ironweed Asteraceae
Trumpetcreeper Bignoniaceae
Velvet Leaf Malvaceae
Vernal Whitlow Grass Brassicaceae
White Clover Fabaceae
White Heath Aster Asteraceae
Yellow Nutsedge Cyperaceae
Yellow Rocket Brassicaceae
Yellow Sweet Clover Fabaceae

Bull Thistle

Bull Thistle is a biennial weed that is commonly found in Kentucky. It belongs to the Asteraceae family and is known for its prickly leaves and purple flowers. The weed can grow up to six feet tall and has a taproot that can reach up to three feet deep. Bull Thistle is often found in disturbed areas such as pastures, roadsides, and fields.

Type

Biennial

Family

Asteraceae

Control

Controlling Bull Thistle can be a challenge due to its deep taproot. One effective method is to hand-pull the weed before it goes to seed. This can be done by grasping the base of the plant and pulling it out of the ground, making sure to remove the entire root. Another method is to use a selective herbicide that targets only the Bull Thistle and not other plants in the area. The herbicide should be applied in the spring or fall when the plant is actively growing.

Bull Thistle

Buttercup

Buttercup is a weed commonly found in Kentucky, belonging to the Ranunculaceae family. It is characterized by its bright yellow flowers and glossy leaves, growing up to two feet tall and typically found in pastures, meadows, and roadsides. Due to its fast-spreading nature, controlling Buttercup can be a challenge.

Type

Annual or perennial

Family

Ranunculaceae

Control

One effective method of controlling Buttercup is by hand pulling the weed before it goes to seed, ensuring the entire root is removed. Alternatively, a selective herbicide can be used that targets only the Buttercup and not other plants in the area, applied during active growth in spring or fall. 

Prevention is the best method of control, achieved by maintaining healthy turf or crops in the area and mowing before the weed goes to seed. Regular monitoring is also essential to catch any new growth of Buttercup before it becomes problematic.

Buttercup weed

Chicory

Chicory, scientifically known as Cichorium intybus, is a perennial weed commonly found in Kentucky. It belongs to the Asteraceae family and is characterized by its blue flowers and toothed leaves. Chicory can grow up to four feet tall and is often found in pastures, along roadsides, and in waste areas.

Type

Perennial

Family

Asteraceae

Control

Controlling Chicory can be challenging due to its deep taproot. One effective method is to use a selective herbicide that targets only the Chicory and not other plants in the area. The herbicide should be applied in the spring or fall when the plant is actively growing. Another method is to hand pull the weed before it goes to seed, ensuring the entire root is removed.

Preventing Chicory from taking over an area is the best method of control. This can be achieved by maintaining healthy turf or crops in the area and mowing before the weed goes to seed. Additionally, regular monitoring of the area is also important to catch any new growth of Chicory before it becomes a problem. By implementing these control measures, the spread and growth of Chicory can be effectively managed.

Chicory

Cocklebur

Cocklebur is an annual weed commonly found in Kentucky, belonging to the Asteraceae family. It is characterized by its prickly burrs and toothed leaves, growing up to six feet tall and often found in pastures, along roadsides, and in waste areas. The weed produces large amounts of seeds, making it difficult to control.

Type

Annual

Family

Asteraceae

Control

Effective methods of controlling Cocklebur include using a selective herbicide that targets only the weed in its early stages of growth, or hand-pulling the weed before it goes to seed, ensuring the entire root is removed. Prevention is key, achieved by maintaining healthy turf or crops in the area and mowing before the weed goes to seed. 

Regular monitoring is also important to catch any new growth before it becomes problematic. By implementing these control measures, the spread and growth of Cocklebur can be effectively managed, reducing its impact on the surrounding environment.

Cocklebur

Common Milkweed

Common Milkweed, scientifically known as Asclepias syriaca, is a perennial weed found in Kentucky. It belongs to the Apocynaceae family and is characterized by its large leaves and clusters of pink or purple flowers. Common Milkweed can grow up to six feet tall and is often found in fields, meadows, and along roadsides.

Preventing Common Milkweed from spreading is the best method of control. This can be achieved by maintaining healthy turf or crops in the area and mowing before the weed goes to seed. Regular monitoring is also important to catch any new growth before it becomes problematic.

Type

Perennial

Family

Apocynaceae

Control

Controlling Common Milkweed can be challenging due to its deep and extensive root system. One effective method is to use a selective herbicide that targets only the weed in its early stages of growth. Another method is to hand pull the weed before it goes to seed, ensuring the entire root is removed. However, it is important to note that Common Milkweed is an important plant for pollinators, so complete eradication may not be desirable.

Common Milkweed

Dandelion

Dandelion, scientifically known as Taraxacum officinale, is a common perennial weed found in Kentucky. It belongs to the Asteraceae family and is characterized by its yellow flowers and toothed leaves. Dandelion can grow up to one foot tall and is often found in lawns, gardens, and along roadsides.

Type

Perennial

Family

Asteraceae

Control

One effective method is to use a selective herbicide that targets only the weed and not other plants in the area. The herbicide should be applied in the spring or fall when the plant is actively growing. Another method is to hand pull the weed before it goes to seed, ensuring the entire root is removed.

Preventing Dandelion from taking over an area is the best method of control, which can be achieved by maintaining healthy turf or crops in the area and mowing before the weed goes to seed. Regular monitoring of the area is also important to catch any new growth of Dandelion before it becomes a problem.

Dandelions

Dock

Dock, scientifically known as Rumex spp., is a perennial weed commonly found in Kentucky. It belongs to the Polygonaceae family and is characterized by its long, narrow leaves and clusters of small flowers. Dock can grow up to six feet tall and is often found in pastures, along roadsides, and in waste areas.

Type

Perennial

Family

Polygonaceae

Control

Controlling Dock can be challenging due to its deep taproot. One effective method is to use a selective herbicide that targets only the weed and not other plants in the area. The herbicide should be applied in the spring or fall when the plant is actively growing. Another method is to hand pull the weed before it goes to seed, ensuring the entire root is removed.

Goldenrod

Goldenrod is a perennial weed found throughout Kentucky. It belongs to the Asteraceae family and is known for its bright yellow flowers that bloom in late summer and early fall. Contrary to popular belief, goldenrod is not responsible for fall allergies, but rather it is the inconspicuous ragweed. 

Kentucky adopted goldenrod as its official state flower in 1926, and about thirty varieties of goldenrod are found in the state, including two endangered species: White-Haired Goldenrod and Short’s Goldenrod.

Type

Herbaceous perennials

Family

Asteraceae

Control

Controlling goldenrod can be challenging, but there are a few methods to manage its growth. One way to control goldenrod is by mowing it regularly before it can flower and produce seeds. Another option is to use herbicides, but this method should be done carefully to avoid damage to other plants. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas. Overall, controlling goldenrod requires a combination of methods, including proper lawn maintenance, herbicides, and hand-pulling.

Goldenrod

Hemp Dogbane

Hemp Dogbane is a perennial weed found in Kentucky and belongs to the Apocynaceae family. It is also known as Indian hemp, American hemp, and rheumatism weed. The plant can grow up to 2 meters tall and is frequently branching. The base of the plant is woody, and it grows in colonies. Hemp Dogbane is a poisonous herb, and its fiber from the bark was used by Indians for making rope.

Type

Perennial

Family

Apocynaceae

Control

Controlling Hemp Dogbane can be challenging as it is resistant to many herbicides. Glyphosate in Roundup Ready corn is perhaps the most effective approach for control of Hemp Dogbane in this crop. Glufosinate (Liberty) can suppress this weed in LibertyLink crops.

Selective broadleaf herbicides such as fluroxypyr (Starane Ultra) and dicamba (Banvel, Clarity) are somewhat effective in conventional corn. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas. Overall, controlling Hemp Dogbane requires a combination of methods, including proper lawn maintenance, herbicides, and aggressive hand-pulling.

Horsenettle

Horsenettle is a warm-season perennial weed found throughout Kentucky. It belongs to the Solanaceae family and is also known as Carolina horsenettle. The plant can grow up to 2 feet tall and has dark green leaves that are sharply lobed with a pointed tip. Horsenettle has large spines on the stems and leaves, and each of its mostly oval leaves has several teeth or shallow lobes on both sides. The weed has clusters of white to purple flowers.

Type

Perennial

Family

Solanaceae

Control

The best approach is to use a combination of cultural and chemical control methods. Cultural control involves mowing the weed regularly before it can flower and produce seeds. Chemical control involves using selective broadleaf herbicides such as 2,4-D, dicamba, and triclopyr. These herbicides are most effective when applied in the fall or early spring when the plant is actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas. Overall, controlling Horsenettle requires a combination of methods, including proper lawn maintenance, herbicides, and hand-pulling.

Horsenettle

Jimsonweed

Jimsonweed is a summer annual weed found throughout Kentucky. It belongs to the Solanaceae family and is also known as Datura stramonium. The plant can grow up to 5 feet tall and has large white to purple trumpet-shaped flowers. Jimsonweed has a distinctive unpleasant odor from its bruised leaves, and all parts of the plant are poisonous. It is commonly found in cultivated areas, waste sites, and pastures.

Type

Annual

Family

Solanaceae

Control

Controlling Jimsonweed can be challenging due to its toxic nature. The best approach is to use a combination of cultural and chemical control methods. Cultural control involves mowing the weed regularly before it can flower and produce seeds. Chemical control involves using selective herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-D, and dicamba.

These herbicides are most effective when applied in the fall or early spring when the plant is actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be dangerous due to the plant’s toxicity. Overall, controlling Jimsonweed requires a combination of methods, including proper lawn maintenance, herbicides, and hand-pulling.

Jimsonweed

Marshelder

Marshelder, also known as sumpweed, is a warm-season annual weed that belongs to the Asteraceae family. It is commonly found in wet and moist areas, disturbed areas, and roadsides throughout Kentucky. Marshelder can grow up to 6 feet tall and has narrow, lance-shaped leaves that are situated in pairs across from each other on the stem. The plant germinates in early spring and flowers in late summer to early fall.

Type

Annual

Family

Asteraceae

Control

Control Marshelder by mowing it regularly before it can flower, using selective broadleaf herbicides such as 2,4-D, dicamba, and triclopyr, and hand-pulling for small infestations. A combination of methods is necessary for effective control.

Marshelder

Maypop Passionflower

Maypop Passionflower, also known as Passiflora incarnata, is a fast-growing perennial vine that belongs to the Passifloraceae family. It is commonly found in cultivated areas, fields, pastures, roadsides, and waste sites throughout Kentucky. Maypop Passionflower has intricate, colorful flowers with prominent styles and stamens that bloom from June to September. The plant can grow up to 30 feet long and has tendrils that help it climb and trail on other vegetation.

Type

Perennial

Family

Passifloraceae

Control

To control Maypop Passionflower, mow it regularly before it can flower, use selective herbicides such as glyphosate, triclopyr, and 2,4-D, and hand-pull for small infestations. A combination of methods is necessary for effective control due to its fast growth and resistance to many herbicides. Apply herbicides in the fall or early spring when the plant is actively growing.

 

Maypop Passionflower

Multiflora Rose

Multiflora Rose, also known as Rosa multiflora, is a perennial weed that belongs to the Rosaceae family. It is a thorny shrub that can grow up to 15 feet tall and is commonly found in pastures, roadsides, and forest edges throughout Kentucky. 

Multiflora Rose was introduced to the United States from Japan in 1866 for use as a rootstock in grafting ornamental roses. It has since become an invasive species that can outcompete native plants and reduce biodiversity.

Type

Perennial

Family

Rosaceae

Control

Controlling Multiflora Rose can be challenging due to its thorny nature and rapid growth. The best approach is to use a combination of cultural and chemical control methods. Cultural control involves mowing the weed regularly before it can flower and produce seeds. 

Chemical control involves using selective herbicides such as glyphosate, triclopyr, and 2,4-D. These herbicides are most effective when applied in the fall or early spring when the plant is actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas.

Multiflora Rose

Musk Thistle

Musk Thistle, also known as Carduus nutans, is a biennial weed that belongs to the Asteraceae family. It is commonly found in pastures, roadsides, and disturbed areas throughout Kentucky. Musk Thistle can grow up to 8 feet tall and has showy pink-purple flowers on long, multi-branched, and spiny stems. The dark green leaves are coarsely bipinnately lobed, with a sharp spine at the tip.

Type

Biennial

Family

Asteraceae

Control

Controlling Musk Thistle requires a combination of methods. The key to successful control is to prevent seed production. Apply herbicides such as Tordon, Vanquish/Clarity, or 2,4-D to Musk Thistle rosettes in spring or fall. Apply Ally or Telar up to the early flower growth stage. Combine control methods into a management system for best results. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas.

Musk Thistle weed

Perilla Mint

Perilla Mint, also known as Perilla frutescens, is an annual weed that belongs to the Lamiaceae or mint family. It is native to East Asia and is commonly found in pastures, hay fields, fencerows, and roadsides throughout Kentucky. Perilla Mint can grow up to 2 feet tall and has broad, opposite leaves that vary in color from green to purple.

Type

Annual

Family

Lamiaceae or mint

Control

Controlling Perilla Mint can be challenging due to its toxicity to livestock and resistance to many herbicides. The best approach is to use a combination of cultural and chemical control methods. Cultural control involves mowing the weed regularly before it can flower and produce seeds. 

Chemical control involves using selective herbicides such as 2,4-D, dicamba, and triclopyr. These herbicides are most effective when applied in the fall or early spring when the plant is actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas.

Perilla Mint

Pigweed

Pigweed, also known as Amaranthus retroflexus, is an annual weed that belongs to the Amaranthaceae family. It is commonly found in gardens, croplands, and disturbed areas throughout Kentucky. Pigweed can grow up to 6 feet tall and has green or red leaves with a distinctive diamond shape. It produces small green flowers that turn into thousands of tiny seeds.

Type

Annual

Family

Amaranthaceae

Control

Controlling Pigweed requires a combination of methods. The key to successful, weed control, is to prevent seed production. Apply herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-D, or dicamba to Pigweed when it is small and actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas. Overall, controlling Pigweed requires a combination of methods, including proper lawn maintenance, herbicides, and hand-pulling.

pigweed

Plantain

Plantain, also known as Plantago major, is a perennial weed that belongs to the Plantaginaceae family. It is commonly found in lawns, pastures, and disturbed areas throughout Kentucky. Plantain can grow up to 2 feet tall and has broad, oval-shaped leaves with prominent veins. It produces small green flowers that turn into thousands of tiny seeds.

Type

Perennial

Family

Plantaginaceae

Control

Controlling Plantain can be challenging due to its deep root system and tolerance to many herbicides. The best approach is to use a combination of cultural and chemical control methods. Cultural control involves mowing the weed regularly before it can flower and produce seeds. Chemical control involves using selective herbicides such as 2,4-D, dicamba, and triclopyr. These herbicides are most effective when applied in the fall or early spring when the plant is actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas.

Plantain

Plumeless Thistle

Plumeless Thistle, also known as Carduus acanthoides, is a biennial weed that belongs to the Asteraceae family. It is native to Europe and temperate Asia and is commonly found in pastures, roadsides, and disturbed areas throughout Kentucky. Plumeless Thistle can grow up to 6 feet tall and has spiny leaves and stems. It produces purple flowers that turn into thousands of tiny seeds.

Type

Biennial

Family

Acanthoides

Control

Controlling Plumeless Thistle requires a combination of methods. The key to successful control is to prevent seed production. Apply herbicides such as Tordon, Vanquish/Clarity, or 2,4-D to Plumeless Thistle rosettes in spring or fall. Apply Ally or Telar up to the early flower growth stage. Combine control methods into a management system for best results. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas. Overall, controlling Plumeless Thistle requires a combination of methods, including proper lawn maintenance, herbicides, and hand-pulling.

Plumeless Thistle weed

Posion Hemlock

Poison Hemlock, also known as Conium maculatum, is a biennial weed that belongs to the Apiaceae family. It is native to Europe and is commonly found in pastures, roadsides, and disturbed areas throughout Kentucky. Poison Hemlock can grow up to 10 feet tall and has fern-like leaves and white flowers that grow in umbrella-shaped clusters.

Type

Biennial

Family

Apiaceae

Control

The key to successful control is to prevent seed production. Apply herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-D, or dicamba to Poison Hemlock when it is small and actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it should be done with caution as all parts of the plant are poisonous. Overall, controlling Poison Hemlock requires a combination of methods, including proper lawn maintenance, herbicides, and hand-pulling.

Posion Hemlock

Queen Anne’s Lace

Queen Anne’s Lace, also known as Daucus carota, is a biennial weed that belongs to the Apiaceae family. It is native to Europe and is commonly found in fields, meadows, and roadsides throughout Kentucky. Queen Anne’s Lace can grow up to 4 feet tall and has delicate white flowers that form a flat-topped cluster. The leaves are fern-like and the stems are hairy.

Type

Biennial

Family

Apiaceae

Control

Controlling Queen Anne’s Lace can be challenging due to its deep taproot and ability to reseed. The best approach is to use a combination of cultural and chemical control methods. Cultural control involves mowing the weed regularly before it can flower and produce seeds. Chemical control involves using selective herbicides such as 2,4-D, dicamba, and triclopyr.

Queen Anne's Lace

Sericea Lespedeza

Sericea Lespedeza, also known as Lespedeza cuneata, is a perennial weed that belongs to the Fabaceae family. It is native to Asia and was introduced to the United States in the late 1800s. Sericea Lespedeza is commonly found in pastures, roadsides, and other disturbed areas throughout Kentucky. It can grow up to 6 feet tall and has small, yellow flowers that bloom from July to September.

Type

Perennial

Family

Fabaceae

Control

The best approach is to use a combination of cultural and chemical control methods. Cultural control involves mowing the weed regularly before it can flower and produce seeds. Chemical control involves using selective herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-D, or dicamba. 

These herbicides are most effective when applied in the fall or early spring when the plant is actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas. Overall, controlling Sericea Lespedeza requires a combination of methods, including proper lawn maintenance, herbicides, and hand-pulling.

Tall Ironweed

Tall Ironweed, also known as Vernonia altissima, is a perennial weed that belongs to the Asteraceae family. It is commonly found in fields, pastures, and along roadsides throughout Kentucky. Tall Ironweed can grow up to 10 feet tall and has dark green leaves and purple flowers that bloom from July to September.

Type

Perennial

Family

Asteraceae

Control

Controlling Tall Ironweed requires a combination of methods. The key to successful control is to prevent seed production. Apply herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-D, or dicamba to Tall Ironweed when it is small and actively growing. Mowing can also be effective for reducing the height of the plant and preventing seed production. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas.

Tall Ironweed

Trumpetcreeper

Trumpet creeper, also known as Campsis radicans, is a woody vine that is native to the southeastern United States. It belongs to the Bignoniaceae family and is a perennial plant that can grow up to 40 feet in length. Trumpet creeper produces large, trumpet-shaped flowers that are red or orange in color and bloom in the summer. It is commonly used as an ornamental plant due to its attractive flowers and ability to attract hummingbirds.

Type

Perennial vine

Family

Bignoniaceae

Control

To get rid of Trumpet creeper, it is recommended to use herbicides such as glyphosate or triclopyr. These herbicides are most effective when applied to the foliage of the plant during its active growth period, which is typically in the summer. It is also possible to control Trumpet creeper by cutting it back to the ground and repeatedly removing any new growth that appears. However, this method may not be as effective as herbicides and may require multiple applications over several years to fully eradicate the plant.

Trumpetcreeper

Velvet Leaf

Velvetleaf, also known as Abutilon theophrasti, is an annual weed that belongs to the Malvaceae family. It is native to China and India but has spread to other parts of the world, including North America, where it is considered a noxious weed. Velvetleaf can grow up to 7 feet tall and has heart-shaped, densely pubescent leaves that may reach lengths of 10 inches. It produces yellow flowers that mature into distinctive seed capsules approximately an inch in diameter.

Type

Annual

Family

Malvaceae

Control

To get rid of Velvetleaf, it is recommended to use herbicides such as glyphosate or 2,4-D. These herbicides are most effective when applied during the plant’s active growth period, which is typically in the summer. It is also possible to control Velvetleaf by hand-pulling or mowing, but this method may not be as effective as herbicides. It is important to remove the plant before it goes to seed to prevent it from spreading further.

Vernal Whitlow Grass

Vernal Whitlow Grass, also known as Draba verna, is a small, spring-flowering annual weed that belongs to the Brassicaceae family. It is widely dispersed around the world and can be found on walls, pavements, and patches of bare ground. It has a complex taxonomy that is not yet fully understood. Vernal Whitlow Grass has a small rosette of oblong leaves that are covered with fine hairs. It produces small white flowers with four deeply lobed petals that bloom on upright stems.

Type

Annual

Family

Brassicaceae

Control

To get control Vernal Whitlow Grass, it is recommended to use herbicides such as glyphosate or 2,4-D. These herbicides are most effective when applied during the plant’s active growth period, which is typically in the spring. It is also possible to control Vernal Whitlow Grass by hand-pulling or mowing, but this method may not be as effective as herbicides. It is important to remove the plant before it goes to seed to prevent it from spreading further.

 

Vernal Whitlow Grass

White Clover

White Clover, also known as Trifolium repens, is a perennial weed that belongs to the Fabaceae family. It is a low-growing plant with white or pink flowers that can be found in lawns, pastures, and gardens throughout the United States. It is typically considered a desirable plant due to its ability to fix nitrogen in the soil and its use as a forage crop for livestock.

Type

Perennial

Family

Fabaceae

Control

To get rid of White Clover, it is recommended to use herbicides such as 2,4-D or glyphosate. These herbicides are most effective when applied during the plant’s active growth period, which is typically in the spring or fall. It is also possible to control White Clover by hand-pulling or mowing, but this method may not be as effective as herbicides. It is important to remove the plant before it goes to seed to prevent it from spreading further.

early fall white clover

White Heath Aster

White Heath Aster, also known as Symphyotrichum ericoides, is a branching perennial weed that can grow up to 5 1/2 feet in height. It has white and yellow flowers and can be found in pastures, forages, and noncrop areas across the United States, from New England to northern Florida, and west to Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, and Louisiana. It belongs to the Asteraceae family and produces abundant flowers with white petals and yellow centers from August to September.

Type

Perennial

Family

Asteraceae

Control

To get rid of White Heath Aster, it is recommended to use herbicides such as 2,4-D, dicamba, or triclopyr. These herbicides are most effective when applied during the plant’s active growth period, which is typically in late summer to early fall. It is also possible to control White Heath Aster by mowing or hand-pulling, but this method may not be as effective as herbicides. It is important to remove the plant before it goes to seed to prevent it from spreading further.

 

White Heath Aster

Yellow Nutsedge

Yellow Nutsedge, also known as Cyperus esculentus, is a perennial weed that belongs to the Cyperaceae family. It is native to North America and is commonly found in lawns and gardens throughout Kentucky. Yellow Nutsedge can grow up to 3 feet tall and has yellow-green leaves and brown seed heads that resemble spikes.

Type

Perennial

Family

Cyperaceae

Control

Controlling Yellow Nutsedge can be challenging due to its extensive root system and ability to re-grow from small pieces of root left in the soil. The best approach is to use a combination of cultural and chemical control methods. Cultural control involves improving soil drainage and reducing watering frequency.

Chemical control involves using selective herbicides such as sulfentrazone, halosulfuron, or imazaquin. These herbicides are most effective when applied in the late spring or early summer when the plant is actively growing. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it should be done with caution as all parts of the plant are poisonous.

Yellow Nutsedge

Yellow Rocket

Yellow Rocket, also known as Barbarea vulgaris, is a biennial or winter annual weed that belongs to the Brassicaceae family. It is native to Europe and Asia and was introduced to the United States in the 1700s. Yellow Rocket is commonly found in fields, gardens, and other disturbed areas throughout Kentucky. It can grow up to 2 feet tall and has yellow flowers that bloom from April to June.

Type

Biennial

Family

Brassicaceae

Control

Controlling Yellow Rocket requires a combination of methods. The key to successful control is to prevent seed production. Apply herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-D, or dicamba to Yellow Rocket when it is small and actively growing. Mowing can also be effective for reducing the height of the plant and preventing seed production. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations, but it can be time-consuming for larger areas.

 

Yellow Rocket weed

Yellow Sweet Clover

Yellow Sweet Clover, also known as Melilotus officinalis, is a biennial weed that belongs to the Fabaceae family. It is native to Europe and Asia and was introduced to the United States in the 1700s. Yellow Sweet Clover is commonly found in fields, roadsides, and other disturbed areas throughout Kentucky. It can grow up to 6 feet tall and has yellow flowers that bloom from May to September.

Type

Biennial

Family

Fabaceae

Control

Controlling Yellow Sweet Clover requires a combination of methods. The key to successful control is to prevent seed production. Apply herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-D, or dicamba to Yellow Sweet Clover when it is small and actively growing. Mowing can also be effective for reducing the height of the plant and preventing seed production. Hand-pulling can also be effective for small infestations.

Yellow Sweet Clover
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Oliver Wright
Oliver Wright

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