Indoor Trees Low Light – 11 of my favorite

If there is enough space inside your house, you can always consider growing indoor trees or tall, tree-like plants that not only add to the aesthetics but also help create a peaceful atmosphere. But the problem with growing indoor trees is that not all spaces inside the house are well-lit. Well, you can always choose to grow indoor trees that thrive in low light. So, what are the indoor trees that don’t need much light to survive?

best indoor trees

Table of Contents

Indoor Trees Low Light

Below I have listed some of my favorite trees that I would personally choose for my home. Indoor trees that can thrive in low light conditions include:

  1. Areca palm
  2. Dragon tree
  3. Money tree
  4. Monstera
  5. Rubber plant
  6. Parlour palm
  7. Corn plant
  8. Kentia palm
  9. Norfolk Island pine,
  10. ZZ plant,
  11. Calamondin orange
bright indirect light

1. Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens)

Areca Palm is a great tree to grow indoors. It tolerates lower light conditions and requires only filtered light. The areca palm generally grows up to six to seven feet in height in a large pot, but you can restrict its size if you keep it in a small container. If there is adequate light, you can also enjoy the tiny white flowers and the purple fruits the tree bears almost all year round.

 

The best part about growing areca palm is that it can tolerate brighter light, while it does well under low light conditions as well. Most people grow this tree in corners, probably near a window where it receives indirect, filtered sunlight for a few hours in the day and it does quite well.

very low light

2. Dragon Tree (Dracaena marginata)

Dragon Tree, also known as Madagascar Dragon Tree, is an amazing tree to grow in low-light areas. You would’ve often seen it growing in houses, offices, and commercial settings as it doesn’t require direct sunlight.

 

Under the right conditions, the dragon tree reaches up to 10 to 15 feet in height. However, if you cut back the stems, you can witness lower, bushier growth. The original dragon tree variety produces narrow green leaves with stunning purple margins. Another variety known as the “Tricolour” variety produces green leaves with red and cream stripes. Both these varieties are gorgeous and can make great additions to the low-light areas in your home.

best low light indoor

3. Rubber Plant (Ficus elastica)

The rubber plant is an important indoor tree that needs low light. These trees grow anywhere between 6 and 10 feet tall in indoor spaces, and even taller outdoors. Rubber plants are perfect for any space. Their broad, waxy leaves can either blend in beautifully with your indoor forest or stand out from the rest as a remarkable feature. The rubber plant comes in different varieties, their leaves could either be tricolour, deep green or almost black.

 The tropical heritage of the rubber plant allows them to thrive indoors, even in low light conditions. I recommend you buy a larger, more established tree because smaller rubber plants tend to grow slowly in low-light conditions. When these plants reach their desired height, they will survive well in lower light without any hassle.

indirect sunlight

4. Neanthe Bella Palm

Also known as parlour palm, Neanthe Bella Palm is ideal for office spaces and rooms where there is no availability of outside light. If necessary, you can use fluorescent ceiling lights. The plant got the name “parlour palms,” because, during Victorian times, the plants were popular in the poorly-lit parlours of Victorian homes.

 

Although the plant is shrubby, it reaches up to 6 feet in height with a 4-foot spread. The Neanthe Bella palm is easily one of the most common indoor palms because it happens to thrive in conditions that a lot of other palms and indoor plants can’t tolerate. It is not only easy to grow but also requires less humidity compared to other palms. On the whole, it performs well in low-light conditions.

lady palm

5. Corn Plant (Dracaena fragrans)

The corn plant is a popular small indoor tree. It thrives in low light conditions with indirect or filtered light providing the ideal environment. If the tree is exposed to direct sunlight, its foliage will burn. You can choose to place the corn plant near the north, east, or west-facing window. If the only option you have is a south-facing window, make sure you place it a few feet back so that its leaves are not scorched.

 

The corn plant reaches up to 6 feet in height. It has wooden stems and tall, strappy leaves that make for a lovely, dramatic display. Variegated cultivars are available, but they need more light to keep their variegation. You should stick to the original variety for low-light areas.

indirect light

6. Kentia Palm (Howea forsteriana)

Kentia palm possesses a cast-iron constitution and in low light conditions, it is known to live for many years. Kentia can even stand low humidity, which is considered a rarity among palms.

 

Well, the Kentia Palm has remained a favorite indoor tree for many centuries, thanks to its tolerance of less-than-ideal conditions. In low light, it’s a slow-growing plant. That is why, for the best results, you should buy a tree about the size you want it to remain.

Kentia Palm (Howea forsteriana)

7. Money Tree (Pachira aquatica)

When it comes to the money tree, you can either grow it in your low-light space as a bonsai tree or allow it to grow tall. The money tree usually reaches up to a height of 6-8 feet as a houseplant, while in its native wild, it can reach up to a whopping height of 60 feet!

 

You can grow the money tree in a well-draining potting mix. When watering, make sure you water generously only when the top 1-2 inches of the soil is dry. Overwatering often results in root rot in money trees.

Money Tree (Pachira aquatica)

8. Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria heterophylla)

The Norfolk Island pine, a common Christmas or holiday tree, can be successfully grown as a houseplant in indoor spaces that do not receive much light. This evergreen pine comes with many short, thin needle-like dark green leaves, eventually making it well-adapted to low light and shady conditions.

Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria heterophylla)

9. Monstera (Monstera deliciosa)

The monstera is a favourite houseplant these days, mainly because they’re quite difficult to kill and they’re really cute to look at. The monstera can survive in all types of light conditions. However, you should be careful, because they may not do well if they don’t receive any light at all.

The monstera can survive low light. There is no second thought about that. But for your monstera to do well as a houseplant, make sure it gets some brighter light or you can supplement using an LED light.

Monstera (Monstera deliciosa)

10. ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia)

If you want a low-light indoor tree that also looks amazing, the ZZ plant is a great option. The ZZ is a low-maintenance plant that just needs the occasional water to thrive. It is best to water it once a week or when the soil has dried out completely. Trust me, it won’t make a big fuss even if you forget to water for longer than that too.

The ZZ plant can live well even without natural light, so low light is not a problem for it. Perhaps, this is exactly why this plant is considered one of the ideal plants for an indoor space with no windows. It doesn’t like direct sunlight, because its leaves get burnt. In other words, as long as you choose to keep it away from windows, it should be fine.

ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia)

11. Calamondin Orange Tree (Citrus mitis)

If you’re looking for some indoor fruit trees that thrive in low light, the calamondin orange is a good bet. Being greeted by the fragrance of an orange tree as you enter a room is certainly an experience. Well, they do need a little more maintenance compared to other options, so you have to be sure that you give them all the water and food they need to thrive. To ensure the moisture levels remain where they have to be, you can have a humidity tray for your orange tree.

Calamondin Orange Tree (Citrus mitis)

Conclusion

Don’t forget that there’s a lot of difference between surviving and thriving. That’s the difference between tolerating low light and growing well under low light conditions. If you really want a tree that thrives in your low-light indoor space, pick one from the 11 featured in this article. I’m sure you won’t be disappointed. Here they are again:

  1. Areca palm
  2. Dragon tree
  3. Money tree
  4. Monstera
  5. Rubber plant
  6. Parlour palm
  7. Corn plant
  8. Kentia palm
  9. Norfolk Island pine,
  10. ZZ plant,
  11. Calamondin orange
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Oliver Wright
Oliver Wright

I hope you enjoy reading some of the content and ideas from this site, I tend to share articles and product reviews on a daily basis, so be rest assured… you won’t run out of things to read!

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