Georgia weeds – 20 most common

The state of Georgia is home to a variety of different weeds, many of which can be difficult to control. Knowing the most common weeds in this area is important for effective weed management and prevention. In this article, you will find 20 of the most common weeds that can be found in Georgia, along with information on their appearance and control strategies.

dense lawn

Table of Contents

Georgia Weeds

Name of Weed Family
Bermuda Poaceae
Bittercress Brassicaceae
Chamberbitter Phyllanthaceae
Chickweed Caryophyllaceae
Clover Apiaceae
Crabgrass Poaceae
Dallisgrass Poaceae
Dandelions Asteraceae
Doveweed Spurges
Goosegrass Poaceae
Ground Ivy Lamiaceae
Henbit Lamiaceae
Lespedeza Legume
Nutsedge Cyperaceae
Oxalis Oxalidaceae
Plantain Plantaginaceae
Poa Annu Poaceae
Poa Trivialis Poaceae
Wild Onion Amaryllidaceae
Wild Violets Violaceae

Bermuda

This weed species is a hardy, coarse-textured grass that spreads through underground stems and rhizomes. It has a deep green color and can be difficult to control due to its spreading habit. You’ll find Bermuda growing on thousands of golf courses because of its ability to withstand mowing.

A lot of people don’t actually consider Bermuda a weed because of its attractive appearance and its ability to be controlled with proper maintenance. However, it can become invasive if not managed properly. The drawback of Bermuda grass is that there are still people who prefer the look, feel, and color of Fescue because it remains green.

Type

Perrenial

Family

Poaceae

Control

  • Mechanical: Hand pulling or mowing
  • Chemical: Pre and post-emergent herbicides such as Roundup, Weed Beater Ultra, or Ortho Ground Clear can be used for controlling Bermuda grass.
clump forming grass

Bittercress

This weed species is an annual broadleaf plant that reproduces by spreading its seed. It has a bitter taste and grows in sunny, moist areas of lawns or gardens. Bittercress can be recognized by its small white flowers and the way it spreads out over the ground.

Bittercress is considered to be a difficult weed to control due to its ability to spread quickly and germinate from even the smallest amount of soil disturbance. It can also tolerate some herbicides, so it is important to select an appropriate product for controlling this weed.

Type

Broadleaf Annual

Family

Brassicaceae

Control

A healthy, thick lawn will block weeds from sprouting and crowd them out if they do manage to grow. The best way to control bittercress is with a pre-emergent application in the fall. However, you can also use a post-emergent while the weed is actively growing.

post emergent weed treatment

Chamberbitter

This weed species is an annual broadleaf plant that has an upright growth habit and produces small yellow flowers. It can be a difficult weed to control because of its ability to spread through the production of seeds and underground stems. The best way to identify chamberbitter is by its yellow flowers, which are typically found between June and August.

Chamberbitter grows in sunny areas with fertile soil and needs plenty of moisture to survive. Although it usually doesn’t cause too much damage, it can compete with other plants for water and nutrients if not managed properly.

Type

Annual Broadleaf

Family

Phyllanthaceae

Control

The best way to prevent chamberbitter from developing is by consistently maintaining your lawn. If the weed does take hold, post-emergent herbicides such as Roundup or Ortho Groundclear can help control it. Proper mowing is also important to prevent the spread of chamberbitter. Keep your mower blades sharp and avoid cutting too low, which can damage the plant and encourage its growth.

weed grows upright

Chickweed

This weed species is a low-growing, prostrate annual that forms mats of foliage and has small white flowers. It thrives in moist areas with poor drainage, often invading lawns and gardens. Chickweed can be difficult to control due to its ability to spread quickly and germinate from even the smallest amount of soil disturbance.

Chickweed prefers cool weather, so it is most active during the spring and fall. It can be identified by its small white flowers and succulent leaves with a faint sheen or frosty appearance.

Type

Annual

Family

Caryophyllaceae

Control

Chickweed is most rampant in lawns that are kept moist and mowed low to the ground. If you want to prevent its growth, avoid over-watering your lawn in the fall season and raise your mower blade.

low growing grassy weed

Clover

This weed species is an annual with a creeping growth habit and small white flowers. It often invades gardens, lawns, and other areas of the landscape where it can be difficult to control due to its rapid germination capabilities. Clover can be identified by its small, round leaves that have a distinctive clover-like odor when crushed.

It prefers moist soil and grows in full sun or partial shade conditions. The best way to reduce the spread of clover is by preventing it from taking hold in the first place through proper maintenance practices such as mowing regularly and removing dead foliage

Type

Perennial Broadleaf

Family

Apiaceae

Control

Applying a pre-emergent application in the fall is the best way to control clover growth. A healthy, fertilized lawn will also help prevent clover from growing in your lawn. If clover does take hold, post-emergent herbicides can help control it. You may also consider using a mulching mower to grind the weed down and reduce its spread. Additionally, certain nematodes can be applied to lawns to help naturally manage clover infestations.

indigenous weed species

Crabgrass

This weed species is an annual grass that has a low, spreading growth habit and grows in thin blades. It can be difficult to control due to its ability to rapidly spread and germinate from even small amounts of soil disturbance. Crabgrass prefers warm weather and full sun conditions, so it is most active during the summer months. The weed gets its name from the crab-like legs protruding from the stem.

Type

Annual Grass

Family

Poaceae

Control

Crabgrass is opportunistic and will colonize any thin or bare areas in your lawn. Applying a pre-emergent herbicide in the spring is the best way to prevent it from taking hold. If crabgrass does develop, post-emergent herbicides can help control it.

Be sure to mow your lawn regularly to keep the weed in check and allow plenty of sunlight into thin areas so that it is less likely to take hold. Additionally, core aeration helps reduce soil compaction which can also inhibit the growth of crabgrass.

form dense patches

Dallisgrass

This weed species is a perennial grass with a coarse, upright growth habit. It often invades lawns and gardens where it can be difficult to control due to its aggressive growth and ability to spread rapidly.

Dallisgrass is a weed that commonly appears in clumps, has grayish-green leaves with a smooth texture, and features a striking vein down the center of each leaf.

Type

Perennial Grass

Family

Poaceae

Control

Dallisgrass is a really tricky weed to eradicate. Multiple post-emergent weed control applications are required, and it is important to make sure that the weedkiller is labeled for use on dallisgrass.

A pre-emergent herbicide application in the spring can help prevent its growth, as can regular mowing and removing dead foliage from your lawn. Additionally, core aeration helps reduce soil compaction which can also inhibit the growth of dallisgrass.

grass clippings dallis grass

Dandelions

This weed species is a perennial with a low-growing growth habit and bright yellow flowers. It is one of the most common lawn weeds, and can be difficult to control due to its aggressive root system and quick germination capabilities

Dandelions are easily identified by their deep taproots, round leaves with jagged edges, and bright yellow flower heads that turn into white puffballs of seeds when mature.

Type

Perennial Broadleaf

Family

Asteraceae

Control

They must be pulled from the taproot up to effectively be exterminated. Pre-emergent herbicides are not effective on dandelions, as they germinate quickly and can easily reestablish from seed. Post-emergent applications will help reduce their spread if applied correctly.

Dandelions

Doveweed

This weed species is an annual with a low-growing growth habit and almost hairless leaves. It usually appears in thin turf areas where it can spread quickly and be difficult to control. Doveweed prefers warm weather conditions, so it’s most active during the summer months. The leaves are smooth and a deep green, while the flowers grow in clusters and are vibrant purple.

Type

Annual Grass

Family

Spurges

Control

Doveweed is best controlled by regularly mowing your lawn as well as removing dead foliage from the area. Watering and fertilization requirements should also be kept up to date as doveweed is opportunistic and will colonize any thin or bare areas.

oval shaped green leaves

Goosegrass

Goosegrass is a weed composed of mostly green, flat stems. White coloring is present at the bottom and lower sections of the plant. The leaves are long and narrow, with a pointy tip. Goosegrass is most easily identified by its thick stems and pointed seed heads.

Type

Annual Grass

Family

Poaceae

Control

To have a healthy lawn, it is recommended to Core Aerate each year because Goosegrass thrives in compacted soil. To control this weed, post-emergent herbicides may be used to target established Goosegrass. Be sure to apply the herbicide during the early stages of growth and follow up with another application as needed.

Goosegrass

Ground Ivy

Ground Ivy is a broadleaf weed  that can spread quickly and take over areas in lawns. It is characterized by its kidney-shaped leaves and small, purple flowers. Ground ivy has a unique sweet smell when crushed or mowed and it often invades moist, shady areas where there is weak turf growth. The stems are four-sided with a fuzzy appearance.

Type

Perennial Broadleaf

Family

Lamiaceae

Control

Ground Ivy can be difficult to control due to its aggressive growth habit. To remove this weed from your lawn more effectively, it is recommended to regularly mow your lawn as short as possible and spot treat the weeds with post-emergent herbicides. Additionally, application of pre-emergent herbicides helps.

Ground Ivy

Henbit

Henbit is an annual broadleaf weed that has a low-growing growth habit. It can spread quickly and takes over areas in lawns with weak turf throughout the growing season. Its leaves are oval and serrated at the edges, while its flowers are purple and tubular.

Henbit’s fibrous root system allows it to grow to a maximum height of 16 inches. In addition, its reddish-purple flowers have dark spots on the lower petals and germinate in either fall or winter.

Type

Annual Broadleaf

Family

Lamiaceae

Control

Roundup is great for controlling Henbit, but the chemical should only be applied when the weed is actively growing. The best way to control Henbit is to keep lawns healthy with regular watering and fertilization. Additionally, pre-emergent herbicides can help prevent new weeds from germinating.

Henbit

Lespedeza

Lespedeza, also commonly known as Bush Clover, is a perennial legume weed that spreads rapidly. It has small, thin leaves and small purple flowers that can be seen in the summer months. Lespedeza can grow up to 4.5 feet tall and prefers a sunny environment with moist soil.

Type

Annual Broadleaf

Family

Legume

Control

Compacted soil is an ideal condition for lespedeza to grow and spread. To help control this weed, it is important to keep your lawn healthy by watering and fertilizing regularly. Additionally, core aerating your lawn will help to break up the compacted soil and improve turf growth.

Lespedeza

Nutsedge

Nutsedge, also commonly known as Nutgrass, is a perennial weed with bright green leaves and sharp edges. It grows in clumps with yellow flowers that emerge from spikes or “nuts” located at the top of the plant. Nutsedge prefers moist soil and can spread rapidly throughout lawns.

Nutsedge might go unnoticed at first because its seeds look like out-of-season Bermuda grass and thatch.

Type

Perennial Grass

Family

Cyperaceae

Control

Regular maintenance is key when controlling Nutsedge. To achieve a healthy lawn, it is important to have proper mowing and watering schedules. Additionally, post-emergent herbicides can help target established weeds like Nutsedge. Be sure to apply the herbicide during the early stages of growth and follow up with another application as needed.

Nutsedge

Oxalis

Oxalis, also known as Yellow Woodsorrel or Sourgrass, is a low-growing weed with three leaflets that resemble clovers. Its flowers are white and can be seen in the summer months. Oxalis thrives in moist areas of your lawn and prefers full sun.

Type

Perennial Broadleaf

Family

Oxalidaceae

Control

Lespedeza love compacted soil, so make sure to Core Aerate your lawn every year. The best time to apply post-emergent weed control is while the weed is actively growing.

Oxalis

Plantain

This low-growing weed has wide, green leaves that grow in a circular arrangement. Leafless stalks grow upright from the base, with seeds on the end. Plantain is a tough weed that can survive in almost any condition and prefers heavily trafficked areas.

Type

Perennial Broadleaf

Family

Plantaginaceae

Control

Compacted soil is an ideal condition for Plantain to grow and spread. To control this weed, it is important to core aerate your lawn every year. Additionally, applying post-emergent herbicides targeting broadleaf weeds can help with controlling this stubborn weed.

Plantain

Poa Annua

Poa Annua, also known as Annual Bluegrass, is a hardy annual weed that can spread quickly in lawns. Its leaves are thin and narrow with pointed tips, while its flowers are light green or yellowish-green. Poa Annua prefers moist soil and can survive in both sun and shade.

Type

Annual Grass

Family

Poaceae

Control

Poa Annua prefers moist soil, so be careful not to overwater your lawn. For best results, treat your lawn with a pre-emergent herbicide in the fall to prevent the seeds from germinating.

Poa Annua

Poa Trivialis

Poa Trivialis is a light green, grassy weed that thrive in dense patches during late fall and winter. However, as temperatures begin to rise, Poa Trivialis will start to die out and leave behind unsightly brown patches in the lawn.

Type

Perennial Grass

Family

Poaceae

Control

Don’t overwater your lawn as Poa Trivialis prefers moist soil. Apply a pre-emergent herbicide in the fall to prevent the weed from growing and reapply as needed. Additionally, regularly fertilizing your lawn will help keep it healthy and strong to outcompete weeds.

Poa Trivialis

Wild Onions

Wild Onions are easily identified by its tall, green leaves and white clusters of bulbs. The bulbs have a strong onion-like scent when crushed or cut into pieces. Wild Onions prefer full sun and thrive in lawns that lack regular maintenance.

Type

Perennial Bulb

Family

Amaryllidaceae

Control

The best way to get rid of wild onions in your lawn is to use post-emergent weed control. Unfortunately, there is no pre-emergent weed control that will prevent them from growing in the first place.

Wild Onions

Wild Violets

Wild Violets are a perennial weed with heart-shaped leaves and small flowers that range in color from purple, blue to white. These weeds grow low along the ground and prefer moist soil conditions.

Type

Annual or Perennial Broadleaf

Family

Violaceae

Control

Wild violets can be difficult to control due to its spreading underground roots. To prevent these weeds from growing, use a pre-emergent herbicide in early spring or fall. Additionally, regularly mowing your lawn will help keep it healthy and strong enough to outcompete invasive weeds like Wild Violets.

Wild Violets
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Oliver Wright
Oliver Wright

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