Gardening Tips for People with Limited Mobility and Disabilities

Gardening tips for people with disabilities. Gardening is a great hobby for people of any age. Whether you’re big, small, young or old, gardening has many benefits and will help to improve your health and wellness.

A recent study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that gardening increases physical activity which can help to reduce stress. The study also showed that gardening can improve mental health and social connections.

Sadly, not everyone can garden because of mobility limitations or disabilities that may prevent them from being able to access the outdoors. Are there ways to garden with a disability? You bet there are!

Read on to learn how you can be successful at gardening with a disability or limited mobility.

Limited Mobility

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Tips for gardeners who have limited mobility or live with a disability

limited-1When it comes to gardeners who have limited mobility or live with a disability, the best way to get started is to take a look at what you can do “before getting started”.

If you’re on the ground, one of the best tips is to start with raised beds or containers that are easy to work in. You may also want to consider areas of your garden where water doesn’t pool and build up when it rains because this will make it easier for you to get around when watering your plants.

Make sure any tools that will be needed are accessible too – if not, we recommend purchasing ergonomic gardening tools like Gardena’s adjustable shovels which come with long handles and heads specifically designed for people who need them (notably gardeners who have back problems).

Raised Beds

Raised beds are ideal for people who have physical limitations. They are easier to step into than a traditional garden bed and they don’t have the same requirements for bending over that you would need in a regular raised bed.

To create your raised beds, start by laying out stakes that will be used as markers for where your garden beds go and then stake down string or twine at each corner of the space where you want the bed to be placed.

This is how you’ll know what size of raised bed material to buy (and also creates an outline). Then cut two lengths of boards equal to those measurements plus about one foot on either side (or just lay them end-to-end), so they can serve as sides once nailed together, hammered flat across the top edges and screwed tightly onto the frame.

Hanging Baskets

hanging-basketWhen it comes to gardeners who have limited mobility or live with a disability, the best way to get started is to take a look at what you can do “before getting started”.

If you’re on the ground, one of the best tips is to start with raised beds or containers that are easy to work in. You may also want to consider areas of your garden where water doesn’t pool and build up when it rains because this will make it easier for you to get around when watering your plants.

Make sure any tools that will be needed are accessible too – if not, we recommend purchasing ergonomic gardening tools like Gardena’s adjustable shovels which come with long handles and heads specifically designed for people who need them (notably gardeners who have back problems).

Gardneing Aids

limited-3Garden aids are important to consider if you’re limited in mobility or have a disability, and they can make gardening much easier.

There are many garden aids on the market that will work for just about anyone who has some sort of limitation:

The most important thing is to be creative in your approach because there’s always something out there that fits your needs.

Tips on Garden Tools

Before you start, think about the existing tools you already have. Then, search for Appropriate Gardening Tools you may need. You’ll want to start your search by considering what type of disability you have, and how mobility is impacted.

For those who are wheelchair-bound or use a walking stick or walker, consider tools that can be used from the ground level – such as gardening gloves and kneeling pads.

For those who have no problem bending and stretching but are unable to reach high spots on plants due to lack of upper body strength, an extendable pole saw might be just the thing needed when it comes time trimming branches from trees or bushes. These are also lightweight tools, so they will come in very handy.

Electric Powered Hedge Trimmer Tools

Another idea is to use garden window boxes. These are a great option for people who can’t reach out too far, and they’ll be easy to water or care for with just one hand. You can also place containers outside that could hold some of your plantings so they don’t have to bend down too much. 

Pruning Shears

Pruning shears also come in handy for anyone looking to maintain hedges without any trouble at all and leaf blowers help make light work out of picking up leaves during autumn clean-up periods as well as keeping pathways clear over winter months.

Ergonomic Grips and Telescopic Handles

Some of the features to look for when choosing gardening tools are a design that is appropriate for one’s disability, comfort and ergonomic grips and telescopic handles so it can grow with them as they age or their physical condition changes over time.

Tips On Ground Cover Plants

wheelbarrow-elderly

These plants are a simple way for people with limited mobility or who live with a disability to still be successful at gardening.

G.C.P are like shrubs, they do not need any additional care and the gardener only needs to cut them back every couple of years.

There are many types of these plants that can grow in various climates and conditions which is great for those living with disabilities because there will be something perfect for their specific situation.

These also have other benefits such as giving shade from the sun, providing mulch naturally over time (which protects against pests) and preventing weeds from coming up on your garden bed by themselves without using chemicals.

The benefits of Gardening

Consider having a semi-wild lawn with mown paths instead of an ordinary large one. This will allow you to save time and effort on the maintenance for your yard, which can often be tedious work.

Gardening is good for you

Gardening is therapeutic in many ways: it can help with depression, anxiety and stress levels; as well as provide an opportunity to explore new interests that may not have been possible before due to physical limitations such as travelling or going out alone for the first time.

A way to break up the day

It also provides another activity that people with limited mobility (or who are home-bound) can do on their own schedule at any pace they want even if that means just sitting down and watching things grow day by day.

What is an Enabled Garden?

An enabled garden is a garden that has been created with the intention of being accessible to people who have disabilities or limited mobility. 

  • There are many ways to create an enabled garden, such as the use of ground effects and raised beds.
  • Every garden can be made more accessible with just a few adjustments: for example, adding paths or terraces, providing benches for sitting or laying down on during breaks from gardening work.

A garden that can be enjoyed by all

The ultimate goal is to have plants and a garden that can be enjoyed by everyone, irrespective of having a disability or not, which is something that can be accomplished with the use of an enabled garden.

Can I get a grant to do my gardening?

The Gardening for the Disabled Trust provides financial assistance, grants and advice to those with disabilities all over England.

What requirements do you need?

limited-2The only requirements are that you be a member of their gardening club, have written permission from your G.P or other professional confirming your disability/health condition, and provide detailed information about what work needs to happen in order for them to award you the grant.

You can also consider contacting your local Rotary, Round Table or Lions Club. These groups may be willing to fund a portion of the garden in order to help you raise money for it and give you relevant advice on planting and all other things gardening!

Can carers get help with gardening?

If you have a carer to help with plants and gardening, then be sure that they are aware of the physical and mental challenges.

It may also prove useful for your carers to spend time during the day in order to learn about plants/gardening so that they can help you maintain your garden layout properly.

Many disability organisations offer training courses on how best to provide assistance without causing harm or committing any errors themselves.

Resources

There are many gardening resources for people with disabilities. The following organizations and websites provide a wealth of information about the benefits, tips and tricks, as well as grants and funding opportunities to help make your garden accessible.

For more information and tips, have a look at the below:

National Gardening Association has a section on their website dedicated specifically to accessibility in gardens which can be found here.

The National Coalition on Health Care offers an article called “Gardens Provide Pathways to Wellness” that provides further detail into the ways in which different groups benefit from gardening such as those who may live with a disability.

Another organisation is Adaptive Living Resources (ALR) who specialize in making homes more livable by adapting them for everyone’s needs including those living with disabilities.

Gardening Tips for People with Disabilities - Conclusion

The benefits of gardening for people disabled people are limitless and it’s a great way to bring something extra to your life.

Gardening can be a pleasurable and therapeutic experience that supports mobility, socialization (gardens often foster community), physical activity, mental health, and emotional well-being.

The key to being successful in the garden is to commit to it and find the right balance between being able to complete physical tasks.

I hope this blog post has given you the motivation to start your own garden, to get started with looking after plants and try something new in your existing garden.

Remember to keep your garden accessible for everyone, and don’t be afraid of making mistakes. Happy planting!

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