Flowers that start with the letter Q

It’s easy to overlook the letter Q when it comes to flowers. After all, there are so many other letters in the alphabet that seem more important. But Q is an important letter, and it has some pretty amazing flowers associated with it. In this article, we’ll take a look at some of the best flowers that start with the letter Q. So hold on to your hat, because things are about to get pretty interesting !

FLOWERS THAT START WITH THE LETTER Q

Table of Contents

Quaker Ladies

Quaker Ladies is a species of flower that gets its name from the shape of its petals, which resemble the bonnets worn by Quaker women in the 18th century. The flowers are white or pale pink and have a sweet, lemony scent. They bloom in early summer and can be found in woodlands and meadows in North America

Quaker Ladies

Quaker’s Bonnet

Quaker’s Bonnet is a wildflower that is native to North America. It is a member of the sunflower family and its scientific name is Camassia quamash. The flower gets its common name from its resemblance to the hats worn by members of the Religious Society of Friends, also known as Quakers. Quaker’s Bonnets are usually purple or blue in color, but they can also be white or pink. These flowers typically bloom in the spring and summer months.

Quaker’s Bonnet

Quaking Grass

Quaking grass is a type of flower that gets its name from the way its leaves shake in the wind. This plant is native to Europe and Asia, and it’s often used as an ornamental plant in gardens. Quaking grass is a perennial, which means it comes back year after year. The flowers are small and green, and they grow in clusters.

Quaking Grass

Quamoclit (Morning Glory)

Quamoclit, or morning glory, is a flowering plant that gets its name from the Latin word for “climbing.” The plant is native to tropical America and typically blooms in shades of pink, blue, and purple. Quamoclit is a fast-growing annual that can reach up to 15 feet in length. To grow quamoclit, sow the seeds in well-drained soil in full sun to partial shade. The plants will bloom from summer to fall. Deadhead the flowers regularly to encourage continued blooming. Quamoclit is also known as ipomoea nil and common names include climbing morning glory, cypress vine, hearts entwined vine, love-in-a-puff, and sweet potato vine.

Quamoclit (Morning Glory)

Anne’s Lace

Queen Anne’s lace is a beautiful, delicate flower that can add a touch of elegance to any garden. The Queen Anne’s lace plant is native to Europe and Asia, and has been introduced to North America. It is a member of the carrot family, and its scientific name is Daucus carota.

Queen Anne’s lace gets its name from the legend that Queen Anne herself was responsible for its creation. The story goes that the queen was trying to make a more delicate version of the then-popular laces made from coarse hempen thread. In her attempts, she accidentally created this lovely flower instead!

Anne’s Lace

Queen Anthurium

Queen Anthurium is a flowering plant that belongs to the family Araceae. It is native to the Caribbean islands and South America. The plant grows up to 12 inches tall and produces white or pink flowers. Queen Anthurium is an easy plant to grow and does not require much care. The plant prefers filtered sunlight and well-drained soil. Water the plant when the soil is dry to the touch. Fertilize Queen Anthurium once a month during the spring and summer months. Overwatering can cause root rot, so be sure to check the soil before watering.

Queen Anthurium

Queen Lily Ginger

Queen Lily Ginger (Hedychium coronarium) is a fragrant, tropical flower that blooms in the summer. The flowers are white with yellow stamens and have a strong ginger scent. Queen Lily Ginger is native to India and Nepal and grows best in full sun to partial shade. It prefers moist, well-drained soil and is tolerant of drought. To grow Queen Lily Ginger, start by planting the bulbs in spring. Bulbs should be planted about six inches deep and eight inches apart. Once the bulbs have sprouted, water them regularly and fertilize monthly during the growing season. When the flowers appear, cut them off at the base of the stem to encourage more blooming. Queen Lily Ginger can be propagated by dividing the bulbs in fall.

Queen Lily Ginger

Queen of Sheba

The Queen of Sheba is a stunning flower that gets its name from the ancient queen who was said to have brought them back from her travels. They’re native to Africa and Arabia, and they thrive in hot, dry climates. If you’re lucky enough to live in an area with these conditions, you can easily grow Queen of Sheba flowers. Here’s what you need to know.

Queen of Sheba plants are large shrubs or small trees that can grow up to 20 feet tall. The leaves are dark green and glossy, and the flowers are white with purple centers. These beautiful blooms only last for a day or two, but they appear in clusters throughout the summer months.

To plant Queen of Sheba, choose a sunny spot in your yard with well-drained soil. Dig a hole that’s twice as wide as the root ball and just as deep, then backfill with a mixture of half sand and half loam. Water well and fertilize monthly during the growing season.

Queen of Sheba is a low-maintenance plant, but it does require regular pruning to keep it looking its best. After the flowers fade, cut back the stems to about six inches above ground level. This will encourage new growth and more flowers next season. With just a little care, you can enjoy these beautiful blooms for many years to come.

Queen of Sheba

Queen of the Meadow

Queen-of-the-meadow (Eupatorium purpureum) is a North American wildflower that has clusters of small, pinkish-purple flowers. It blooms in summer and fall and grows best in full sun to partial shade. The plant can reach up to four feet tall, so it’s perfect for the back of a garden border. To grow queen-of-the-meadow, start with seeds or transplants in spring. The plants prefer moist soil, so keep them watered well during dry periods. Deadhead spent flower heads to encourage continued blooming. Queen-of-the-meadow is a good choice for butterfly gardens and attracts bees and other pollinators. It’s also deer resistant. Another plus: the plant is tolerant of wet soils, so it’s a good choice for rain gardens.

Queen of the Meadow

Queen of the Night

The Queen of the Night is a white flower with a strong, sweet fragrance. It’s native to Central and South America, and its scientific name is Cestrum nocturnum. This species is part of the nightshade family, which also includes potatoes, tomatoes, and peppers. The Queen of the Night blooms only at night (hence its name), and its flowers close up during the day.

If you’re interested in growing Queen of the Night in your garden, it’s important to know that it’s a tropical plant that requires warm temperatures and lots of sun. It’s not frost-tolerant, so if you live in an area with cold winters, you’ll need to grow it indoors or in a greenhouse. Queen of the Night is a fast-growing plant, and it can reach up to 15 feet in height. Once it blooms, it will continue to bloom for several months.

Queen of the Night

Queen of the Prairie

The Queen of the Prairie is a tall, showy flower that’s native to North America. Its scientific name is Filipendula rubra, and it’s part of the rose family. This species gets its common name from its habit of growing in prairies and meadows. The Queen of the Prairie has deep pink flowers that bloom from June to August.

If you want to grow Queen of the Prairie in your garden, it’s important to know that it prefers full sun and moist soil. It’s a perennial plant, which means it will come back year after year. Queen of the Prairie is also fairly drought-tolerant once it’s established. You can start seeds indoors in late winter or early spring, or you can wait to sow them directly in the ground after the last frost date.

Queen of the Prairie

Queen Palm

Queen Palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana) is a fast-growing, elegant palm that can reach up to 50 feet tall. It is one of the most popular palms in Florida and California and can be found in many other warm climates around the world. Queen Palm is easy to grow and maintain, making it a great choice for both beginners and experienced gardeners alike.

If you’re looking for a palm tree that will make a dramatic statement in your landscape, then look no further than the Queen Palm. With its stately stature and beautiful fronds, the Queen Palm is sure to add an element of elegance to any yard or garden. But don’t let its regal appearance fool you – this palm is actually quite easy to grow and care for. With just a little bit of knowledge, you can have a Queen Palm that thrives in your landscape for many years to come.

Queen Palm

Queen Victoria Agave

Queen Victoria Agave, also known as Century Plant, is a popular ornamental plant that belongs to the Asparagaceae family. It is native to Mexico and can grow up to six feet tall. The leaves are blue-green in color with white stripes running along the margins. The flowers are yellow and appear in summertime.

Queen Victoria Agave is easy to grow and requires little maintenance. It tolerates both full sun and partial shade and can be grown in any well-drained soil. Once established, it is drought-tolerant and does not need much water. This plant is also resistant to most pests and diseases.

Queen Victoria Agave

Queensland Firewheel Tree

The Queensland Firewheel Tree (Stenocarpus sinuatus) is a flowering tree that is native to Australia. The tree gets its name from the fact that the flowers resemble wheels of fire. The flowers are red, orange, and yellow and are about four inches in diameter. The tree can grow to be about 30 feet tall and has dark green leaves.

Queensland Firewheel Tree

Queensland Umbrella Tree

The Queensland Umbrella Tree is a species of tree that is native to Australia. It gets its name from the large, umbrella-like canopy that it forms. The tree can grow up to 30 meters tall and has a trunk diameter of up to one meter. The leaves are dark green and glossy, and the flowers are white or cream-coloured. The fruit is a small, red drupe.

The Queensland Umbrella Tree is not difficult to grow, but it does require some care and attention. It prefers full sun but will tolerate partial shade. The tree needs well-drained soil and regular watering during the growing season. Once established, it is drought tolerant. If you live in an area with cold winters, you will need to provide protection for your tree.

Queensland Umbrella Tree

Queen’s Crape Myrtle

Queen’s crape myrtle is a deciduous shrub that typically grows to be 15-25 feet tall and wide. It has dark green leaves that turn bronze in the fall, and its spectacular flowers range in color from white to pink to deep purple. The flowers bloom from late spring through summer, and they are followed by dark purple fruits that are loved by birds.

Queen’s crape myrtle is a tough plant that is adaptable to a wide range of growing conditions. It prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade, and it is tolerant of both dry and moist soils. Once established, this shrub is quite drought-resistant. Queen’s crape myrtle is also relatively pest- and disease-free, making it a low-maintenance plant to grow.

Queen’s Crape Myrtle

Queen’s Crape Myrtle

Queen’s crape myrtle is a deciduous shrub that typically grows to be 15-25 feet tall and wide. It has dark green leaves that turn bronze in the fall, and its spectacular flowers range in color from white to pink to deep purple. The flowers bloom from late spring through summer, and they are followed by dark purple fruits that are loved by birds.

Queen’s crape myrtle is a tough plant that is adaptable to a wide range of growing conditions. It prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade, and it is tolerant of both dry and moist soils. Once established, this shrub is quite drought-resistant. Queen’s crape myrtle is also relatively pest- and disease-free, making it a low-maintenance plant to grow.

Queen’s Crape Myrtle

Queen's Crown ( Zephyranthes )

Queen’s Crown ( Scientific name: Zephyranthes ) is a genus of about 50 species of flowering plants in the family Amaryllidaceae, native to tropical and subtropical America. The genus has a wide range of flower colors, including white, yellow, pink, orange, and red. They are commonly known as rain lilies or zephyr lilies.

Queen's Crown ( Scientific name: Zephyranthes )

Queen’s Cup

Queen’s Cup, also known as Clintonia borealis, is a North American native wildflower. It gets its common name from the shape of its flower which is said to resemble a queen’s cup or chalice. The plant is a member of the lily family and blooms in late spring with white or greenish-white flowers that have six petals. Queen’s Cup grows best in partial shade and moist, well-drained soil. It is an excellent choice for woodland gardens or naturalized areas. To grow Queen’s Cup, start by planting the bulbs in the fall. They will need to be planted about four inches deep and eight inches apart. Once they are in the ground, water them well and then mulch over the top of the bulbs to help protect them from freezing temperatures.

Queen’s Cup will bloom in late spring and the flowers will last for about two weeks. After the flowers fade, the plant goes dormant for the summer. To keep it looking its best, cut off the faded flower stalks and apply a fresh layer of mulch in late summer or early fall. Queen’s Cup is a beautiful wildflower that is easy to grow and care for.

Queen’s Cup

Queen’s Tears

Queen’s Tears is a beautiful flowering plant that gets its name from its large, tear-shaped leaves. This plant is native to tropical regions of Asia and Africa, but it can be grown in most any climate. Queen’s Tears prefers humid conditions and well-drained soil. It can be propagated by seed or division.

Queen’s Tears

Queen’s Wreath

Queen’s Wreath (Petrea volubilis) is a beautiful and fast-growing vine that produces an abundance of lavender flowers. It can be grown in full sun or partial shade and prefers moist, well-drained soil. Queen’s Wreath is a great choice for covering fences, trellises, or arbours. It can also be planted as a ground cover. To encourage flowering, pinch back the tips of the vines in early summer. Queen’s Wreath is an annual vine, so it will need to be replanted each year.

Queen’s Wreath

Quehla Chin Cactus

The Quehla Chin Cactus, native to Mexico, is a beautiful and unique plant that can add interest to any home. Quehla Chin Cactus needs bright light but should be protected from direct sunlight. If you live in an area with intense sun, place the cactus in a shady spot or behind a sheer curtain. Second, this cactus likes it hot! The ideal temperature range is 70-85 degrees Fahrenheit.

Quehla Chin Cactus

Quesnelia

Quesnelia is a genus of flowering plants in the family Bromeliaceae, native to tropical America. The genus is named after 18th-century French botanist Jean Baptiste Quesnel. They are evergreen perennial herbs with basal rosettes of leathery leaves and terminal inflorescences of tubular flowers. The flowers are pollinated by hummingbirds.

Quesnelia quesneliana, or Quesnel’s flower, is a species of plant in the genus Quesnelia native to Brazil. It is an evergreen perennial herb growing to 30 cm (12 in) tall, with a basal rosette of leathery leaves and an inflorescence of orange-red tubular flowers.

Quesnelia

Quisalis indica (Rangoon Creeper)

This flower is native to India and Bangladesh, and it is often used in traditional medicine. The Rangoon Creeper has many different medicinal properties, including antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory. This flower is also known to boost the immune system and help with digestion.

Quisalis indica (Rangoon Creeper)

Quince

Quince is a flowering plant in the genus Cydonia in the family Rosaceae. It is native to warm temperate southwest Asia, Turkey and Iran. A deciduous shrub or small tree growing to between five and eight meters tall, quince has large glossy green leaves and produces white or pink flowers. The fruit of the quince is a round-shaped, yellow-colored Berry that contains five seeds. The fruit is used in jams, jellies and pies, or can be eaten fresh. Quinces are high in vitamins C and K, as well as fiber. They also contain antioxidants that may help protect against cancer and other diseases.

Quince
Share your love
Oliver Wright
Oliver Wright

I hope you enjoy reading some of the content and ideas from this site, I tend to share articles and product reviews on a daily basis, so be rest assured… you won’t run out of things to read!

Articles: 344