Flowers that start with the letter N

There are many beautiful flowers in the world, but did you know that there are also some amazing flowers out there that start with the letter n? In this article, we will explore some of these amazing flowers and learn more about them. We will also discuss why these flowers are so special and why you should consider adding them to your garden. So without further ado, let’s get started!

Flowers that start with the letter N

Table of Contents

Narcissus

Narcissus is a genus of flowering plants in the family Amaryllidaceae. The plants are commonly called daffodils, jonquils or simply narcissi. Narcissus has about 50 species, with the majority being native to southern Europe and North Africa. A few species are also found in Southeast Asia.

The name “narcissus” comes from the Greek legend of Narcissus, a young man who fell in love with his own reflection in a pool of water and drowned trying to reach it. The word “daffodil” comes from an ancient Greek word meaning “to shine.”

Narcissus flowers are characterized by their trumpet-shaped center and six petals that can be white, yellow, pink or orange. The most popular and well-known species is Narcissus pseudonarcissus, or the common daffodil. This plant is native to Europe and has been introduced to North America, where it is now a common sight in springtime.

Other notable species of narcissus include Narcissus jonquilla, or the jonquil, which is native to southern Europe and North Africa; and Narcissus tazetta, or the paperwhite narcissus, which is native to southeastern Asia but has been introduced to other parts of the world as an ornamental plant.

Narcissus

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus) are annual flowering plants in the family Tropaeolaceae, native to South and Central America. The genus name Tropaeolum, comes from the Greek tropaion, meaning “trophy” or “turning point”, referring to the flowers’ use in ancient times as decoration on shields and spears. The common name nasturtium, from Latin nasus tortus meaning “nose-twisting”, refers to the strong smell of its leaves and flowers. Nasturtiums are also known as Indian cress or monks cress.

The plant has large round leaves with a slightly peppery flavor and small edible flowers that come in a range of colors including yellow, orange, and red. Nasturtiums are easy to grow and make a great addition to any garden. They can be planted in the ground or in containers and will bloom from late spring to early fall.

Nasturtiums

Nemesia

Nemesia is a genus of flowering plants in the family Scrophulariaceae. The genus comprises about 80 species, all native to Africa, Madagascar and Arabia. They are mostly annuals or short-lived perennials growing to 15–80 cm tall. The leaves are opposite, simple, sometimes toothed; the flowers are borne in pairs or whorls on the ends of stems, each flower with a tubular base and four spreading lobes. The flowers are typically blue, purple or white. Nemesia strumosa is a species of plant in the genus Nemesia. It is endemic to South Africa.

Nemesia

Nemophila

Nemophila is a genus of flowering plants in the family Boraginaceae. The name is derived from the Greek words nema, meaning “thread”, and phila, meaning “love”. Nemophila are annual herbs native to North America. The genus comprises two species, N. menziesii and N. pedunculata.

Nemophila are best known for their striking blue flowers, which have earned them the common name “baby blue eyes”. The flowers are borne on slender stems and have five petals arranged in a cup-shaped corolla. Each flower has a central boss of stamens surrounded by a ring of smaller pistils. The flowers are pollinated by bees and other insects.

Nemophila are often used as ornamental plants in gardens and landscaping. They are also popular cut flowers, due to their long vase life. Baby blue eyes can be found in a variety of colors, including white, pink, and purple.

Nemophila

Neomarica

Neomarica is a genus of flowering plants in the family Iridaceae. The genus is native to Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina. Neomarica is closely related to Marica, another genus in the same family. Both genera are known for their showy flowers and attractive foliage.

Neomarica

Nepeta

Nepeta is a genus of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae, native to Europe, Asia, and Africa. The genus includes around 250 species of annuals, biennials, and perennials. Nepeta has been used in traditional medicine for centuries and is still employed in some areas today. The plant is also a popular choice for gardens due to its low maintenance and attractive flowers.

Some of the most popular species of Nepeta include N. x faassenii (catnip), N. cataria (catmint), and N. moschata (musk nepeta). These plants are all known for their strong fragrance, which can be appealing to both humans and cats!

Nepeta

Nerine

Nerine is a genus of flowering plants that includes about 30 species. The majority of Nerine species are native to South Africa, with a few others found in Australia, Asia, and Madagascar. All Nerine species produce clusters of showy flowers that range in color from white to pink to red.

The most popular Nerine species is N. sarniensis, or the Cape tulip. This plant produces large, bright red flowers that bloom in late summer or early fall. Cape tulips are commonly grown as ornamental plants in gardens and parks. Other popular Nerine species include N. bowdenii (Madagascar lily) and N. filifolia (threadleaf nerine).

Nerine

Nerium Oleander

Nerium oleander is a flowering shrub that is native to the Mediterranean region. The plant is toxic if ingested, but it is often used as an ornamental plant in gardens. Oleanders come in a variety of colors, including pink, white, and red.

nerium

Nettle-leaved Bellflower

The Nettle-leaved Bellflower (Campanula trachelium) is a species of bellflower that is native to Europe. It gets its name from the fact that its leaves resemble those of the stinging nettle. The flowers are blue or violet and bloom in the summer.

Nettle-leaved Bellflower

New Guinea Impatiens

New Guinea Impatiens (Impatiens hawkeri) is a species of impatiens that is native to New Guinea. It is a popular ornamental plant, and is often used in landscaping and gardens. The flowers are typically red, pink, or white, and have a diameter of about two inches. The plant grows to a height of about three feet, and has oval-shaped leaves. New Guinea Impatiens are easy to care for, and make an excellent addition to any garden or landscape.

New Guinea Impatiens

New York Ironweed

New York Ironweed is a native wildflower that can be found in open woods, along roadsides, and in fields. This tough plant is tolerant of poor soils, full sun, and drought. It gets its name from the iron-like hardness of its stem. The New York Ironweed blooms from mid to late summer with clusters of small purple flowers. These flowers are a favorite of bees and butterflies.

New York Ironweed

Nicotiana

Nicotiana is a genus of herbaceous plants and shrubs of the family Solanaceae, that contains around 60 species of annual and perennial wildflowers, including tobacco. The majority of the species are native to South America, Central America, and Mexico. A few species are indigenous to the United States, Canada, Australia, Africa, and Eurasia.

The genus name Nicotiana was given by Carolus Linnaeus in honor of Jean Nicot de Villemain, French ambassador to Portugal (1559–61), who introduced tobacco to France in 1560.

Linnaeus described 16 species in 1753; as more have been discovered since then, over 60 are now recognized by most taxonomists.

The flowers of Nicotiana are tubular, and the plants are mostly pollinated by insects such as moths and bees that cannot reach the nectar at the bottom of the tube without entering the flower. Many species open their flowers at night to attract nocturnal pollinators such as hawk moths, which have long proboscides that allow them to reach the nectar. Hawk moths are attracted to tobacco plants by their scent, which is released into the air after sunset.

Nicotiana

Nierembergia

Nierembergia is a genus of flowering plants in the family Solanaceae, native to South America. The genus includes around 30 species of annual and perennial herbs and subshrubs. The leaves are typically oval-shaped or lanceolate, and the flowers are white, blue, or purple.

Nierembergia is named after the German botanist Johann Marius Nierenberg (1667-1722). Nierembergia was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1753 work Species Plantarum.

The most common species of Nierembergia in cultivation is Nierembergia hippomanica, also known as cupflower or false hollyhock. This species is native to Brazil and Argentina, and it is widely grown as an ornamental plant in other parts of the world. Nierembergia hippomanica is a herbaceous perennial that grows to around 60 cm (24 in) tall. The leaves are lanceolate, and the flowers are white or pale blue.

Nierembergia

Nigella

Nigella is a genus of flowering plants in the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae. The name Nigella comes from the Latin niger, meaning “black”, referring to the black seeds. There are about 20 species in the genus, all native to temperate regions of Europe, Asia and Africa.

The most common species is Nigella sativa, which is also known as black cumin, kalonji or nigella seeds. It is an annual plant that grows to 20-30 cm tall and produces white or pale blue flowers. The seeds are used as a spice in Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine. Other notable species include Nigella damascena (love-in-a-mist), Nigella arvensis (perennial flax) and Nigella orientalis (desert cumin). All three of these species are used in traditional medicine.

Nigella

Night Phlox

Night phlox is a species of flowering plant in the genus Zaluzianskya. It is native to southern Africa, where it occurs in Namibia, Botswana, and South Africa. The plant is named for its habit of blooming at night. The flowers are white or pale pink and have a sweet fragrance.

Night phlox is a popular garden plant and is often used as an ornamental ground cover. It is also known by the common names summer snowflake and midnight candy. The plant blooms from mid-summer to fall and prefers full sun to partial shade. Night phlox is easy to grow and tolerant of most soils. It can be propagated by seed or division.

Night Phlox

Nodding Wakerobin

Nodding Wakerobin is a genus of flowering plant in the family Trilliaceae, comprising two species: Nodding Wakerobin (Trillium cernuum) and Drooping Wakerobin (Trillium sessile). The name “wakerobin” refers to the plant’s resemblance to a robin, particularly the red breast of the European Robin. The specific epithet cernuum means “nodding”, referring to the nodding inflorescence.

Both species are native to North America, where they are found in woods from Newfoundland to Alberta in Canada, and south to Pennsylvania and Tennessee in the United States. Nodding Wakerobin is also found in Korea and Japan. The plants grow from rhizomes, and produce erect stems 20–60 cm (0.79–23.62 in) tall, bearing three leaves and a solitary flower at the apex.

The flowers are borne on pedicels up to 15 cm (0.59 in) long, and have six tepals which are white or pale pink, sometimes with maroon stripes near the base. The stamens are located beneath the petals, and the ovary is inferior (i.e., below the point of attachment of the other floral parts). The fruit is a red berry containing two seeds.

Nodding Wakerobin is pollinated by bees, flies, beetles, and wasps. The larvae of some moths feed on the leaves of the plant.

Nodding Wakerobin

Nolana

Nolana is a genus of flowering plants in the family Solanaceae, native to arid regions of South America. The genus includes about 60 species, all of which are annual or perennial herbs with tubular flowers. The most common species in cultivation is Nolana parviflora, also known as smallflower nolana or blueburr. This plant is native to Chile and Argentina and has been introduced to Europe and North America as an ornamental plant. It grows to 30 cm (12 in) tall and produces blue or purple flowers from spring to fall.

Nolana

Nymphea

Nymphaea, also known as water lilies, are a genus of flowering plants that grow in freshwater habitats. These flowers are often found in ponds and lakes, and they come in a variety of colors including white, yellow, pink, and purple.

Nymphaea flowers are typically large and showy, with each individual bloom measuring up to 12 inches across. The petals of these flowers are arranged in a radial pattern around the center of the flower. Each Nymphaea flower has both male and female reproductive organs, and they are pollinated by insects such as bees and beetles.

Nymphea
Share your love
Oliver Wright
Oliver Wright

I hope you enjoy reading some of the content and ideas from this site, I tend to share articles and product reviews on a daily basis, so be rest assured… you won’t run out of things to read!

Articles: 344