Flowers Starting With The Letter H

Flowers Starting With The Letter H… Many people who enjoy gardening find themselves drawn to flowers that start with the letter H.

Hydrangeas, for example, are a popular option since they come in a variety of hues and forms.

Other popular choices include Hollyhock, which is a worldwide favourite. Honeysuckle (Lonicera) is a wonderful choice for a garden because it’s hardy and loves the sun.

Flowers have an air of mystery about them, but they come in a variety of shapes and sizes! There’s sure to be one or two we’ve never seen before, so we’ve only included a handful. Are you seeking flower names to assist you in your search? If that’s the case, the list of flower names below may be useful

This article will explore different types of flowers that start with the letter H:

flowers beginning with h

Table of Contents

Heather (Erica)

The heather flower’s meaning derives from its genus name, Calluna, which is derived from the Greek word kalluno and means “to cleanse or decorate.” This is fitting, given that heather plants were once used to create brooms.

Wild Heather

Hebe 'Showy Speedwell' (New Zealand Native)

Hebe speciosa is a flowering plant in the plantain family known by the English names New Zealand hebe, showy hebe, showy-speedwell, and Titirangi and Napuka. It is native to New Zealand, but it has become naturalized in other parts of the world where it is cultivated as an ornamental for its spectacular blooms.

Hebe 'Showy Speedwell' (New Zealand Native)

Helenium (Sneezeweed)

The genus name for this flower is derived from the Greek word helios meaning “sun” and refers to its sun-like blossoms. This makes sense because sneezeweed derives part of its common name from an old superstition that says if you touch or smell it, you’ll get a bout of sneezing.

Helenium (Sneezeweed)

Heliotrope (Cherry Pie Plant)

This flower’s name is derived from the Greek words helios, meaning sun and tropos, meaning “turn.” This refers to how Heliotrope turns its blossoms toward the sun.

Heliotrope (Cherry Pie Plant)

Hellebore (Winter rose)

The name of this flower comes from the Greek word ereos, which means “a wild animal” and refers to how its poisonous flowers resemble fangs.

Hellebore (Winter rose)

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (Rose Mallow)

This flower’s name is derived from the Malaysian word for “flower,” hibiscus.

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (Rose Mallow)

Hollyhock(Alcea Rosea)

This flower’s name is derived from the Middle English word hok, which means “a hook” and refers to how its leaves are shaped like hooks.

The common name for this plant comes from the Old English holegn, meaning “holy,” because it was used in church decorations during Easter. These flowers grow best when planted near a fence or trellis so their vines can climb up them easily.

Hollyhock(Alcea Rosea)

Honesty (Lunaria)

Honesty (Honest Plant) The genus of Honesty is Lunaria annua, which derives its naming origins back to Ancient Rome where people believed honesty would bloom on moonlit nights if left untouched by human hands.

Honesty (Lunaria)

Honeysuckle (Lonicera)

This flower’s name is derived from the Greek words lonos, meaning “a molar” and kerkis, which means a “stick.” This refers to how its roots look like a toothbrush.

Honeysuckle (Lonicera)

Hosta (Plantain Lily)

The genus name for this flower is derived from the Greek word hostis, which means “stranger.” This refers to how these flowers were originally called plantain lilies because they weren’t native to Greece.

Hosta flower

Hyacinth (Asparagus Family)

The genus name for this flower is derived from the Greek word huakinthos, which means “spur.” This refers to how its stem resembles a spur.

Hyacinth (Asparagus Family)

Hydrangea (Hortensia)

This flower’s name derives from the Greek words hydro and chainein meaning “water” and “to gape or open up,” respectively. The flowers of hydrangeas resemble gaping mouths with their light blue petals spread wide apart.

Hydrangea (Hortensia)

Hypericum (St. John's Wort)

This flower’s genus name is derived from the Greek words hyper and eikon meaning “over an apparition.” This refers to how people used Hypericum in medieval times to exorcise evil spirits.

Hypericum (St. John's Wort)
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Oliver Wright

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